Review: To Wed the Fae Prince

Reviewed by Jen

Etta has been promised to the Fae since she was born.  Her parents made a deal with the Seelie Court when they were trying to conceive and from that point on, she was betrothed to a prince.  Now in Fairy, Etta thinks it is the eldest prince she is to marry, but it turns out that the younger prince, Farron, is her intended.  Sullen and known to hate humans, Farron seems like the worst possible choice.  But Etta doesn’t really have much of a choice at all.  Either she honors her parents’ deal or they pay the consequences.

First of all, I was a little put off when I discovered the heroine was only 17. I’m not a YA fan and this book was pitched as an adult romance.  And believe me, Etta is very much a child.  The author uses the nature of the Fae land to make her technically older in a short period of time, but just because her body ages, it doesn’t actually make her 22.

Farron makes a better character.  He is earnest and misunderstood –and he really comes through when push comes to shove, but we really don’t get to know him on a deeper level, as the story is told from Etta’s point of view.

There are moments when the story shows promise.  It’s hard to put my finger on, since there were so many things that bothered me, but I think it’s probably in the overall writing style, which is pretty engaging.  The pacing is fast and the story moves.  I wasn’t bored.

But.  The concerns Etta places so much stock in… over the course of the story are simply picked up and dropped at will. She quickly gets over her (legitimate) concerns about the nature of the Fae… the deals, the slavery, etc.  She goes from disliking Farron to falling in love with him super fast (no many how many years passed in the human world.)  And she goes from fighting his sexual advances to losing her virginity  on a table with her skirts thrown up.

Which brings me to the sex.  I love a good sex scene, I do.  But some of the language here made me cringe.

“As he slid his fingertips against my sopping wet gash, I pushed against them.”

Ew.  Sopping wet gash?  In total, we hear about her “gash” three times, which is three times too many in my opinion.  Not to mention, every time Etta was in a sexual situation, all I could think of was how immature and childlike she seemed.

It just didn’t work for me.

Rating: D+

*Book provided by author for review

Click to purchase: Amazon
To Wed the Fae Prince
by V Vervain
Release Date: August 4, 2012

Comments

  1. Gash?!? Why didn’t the author just use “sopping wet axe-wound”? Barf.
    Thanks for the heads up. I’ll definitely avoid this one.

  2. Gash = GROSS!!! D+ sounds generous.

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