Review: Breaking His Rules by Aliza Mann

Reviewed by Debz

So, I just started using my twitter to get more book recommendations and not just to troll/hype my friends and I’ve newly gotten super immersed into romancelandia on twitter. It has been a hot mess month there guys, a hot mess. However, I was still able to get book recommendations from authors and book bloggers and this is my first foray into a book  I saw solely on twitter. 

First thing I have to say is that it feels like the author is my friend. I have never met or spoken to her before, but she and the book sounds like a conversation I’m having with my friends. The words used and the tone just seem so familiar to me and I dig it.

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Review: Private Eye by Katrina Jackson

Reviewed by Olive

Private Eye is the second book in Katrina Jackson’s The Spies Who Loved Her series. It follows cam model and awesome business woman Maya (ThickaThanASnicka) and her favourite private chat client, MasquerAsiaN. Maya has been fantasising about this mysterious client for ages and she doesn’t even know his real name…

Until, that is, her best friend and roommate comes out to her as an assistant to spies that need her help. Her partner in this mission? None other than MasquerAsiaN, aka Kenny. Maya has to decide how to handle all this new information and determine if she can trust her feelings, Kenny, or anything ever again.

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Review: The Ultimate Pi Day Party by Jackie Lau

Reviewed by Olive

The Ultimate Pi Day Party is the first book in Jackie Lau’s new Baldwin Village series, set in the eponymous foodie artistic neighbourhood of Toronto. The story follows Josh, a tech CEO with massive daddy issues, as he falls for Sarah, the owner of a local pie shop. After testing the delicious sweet and savoury concoctions dreamt up by Sarah, he concocts a scheme to throw the ultimate Pi Day party and win his way back into his father’s notice (Josh’s estranged dad is a retired math teacher). Turns out, Sarah is just as irresistible as her pie and romance ensues.

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Review: Tikka Chance On Me by Suleikha Snyder

Reviewed by Sara

Suleikha Snyder’s novella, “Tikka Chance On Me” is a lot of things; it’s a small town romance, a Motorcycle Club romance, an interracial romance and most of all a fan-freaking-tastic Romance.

University of Chicago student, Pinky Grover, has come back to small town Eastville, Indiana, to help with her family’s Indian restaurant when her mother gets sick. Eastville hasn’t changed since she was in high school, except the local motorcycle club has recruited a new enforcer and it’s none other than local bad boy legend, Trucker Carrigan. Pinky is smart, but there’s something about Trucker that makes all reason leave her head. She knows Trucker is a bad bet, but there’s something about him, something she can’t quite put her finger on that makes her think that maybe a walk on the wild side might not be such a bad idea.

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Review: Billionaire’s Unwanted Black Twin Babies by Ciara Cole

Reviewed by Debz

Honestly, I have no idea why I read this book. I really don’t. It’s just that when I enter a mini reading slump, I have to find a ridiculous book to jog me out of my funk. And buy was this ridiculous. First of all, the name guys…..it’s a bit much.

The story telling wasn’t any better. As someone who has been blessed with the opportunity to beta read for authors and friends alike, it’s very obvious to me now when a book is at it’s first draft stage and when it has been refined numerously to be fit for public consumption. This books reads like a first draft, and it’s annoying. The way the words are strung together feels clunky and inorganic.

Don’t even get me started on the objectification of both men and women in this story. The characters refer to the other sex as ‘male’ or ‘female’ and I don’t know if this bugs only me, but it feels dehumanizing and patronizing to me. You might as well just go the extra mile and call them men or women. Plot twist….I’m one chapter into this book, guys. [Read more…]

Review: The Switch by Nia Arthurs

Reviewed by Debz

I’ve never been to Belize before, but it does sound amazing from everyone raving about the beautiful beaches and food. This means that I have only thought about it in terms of the country being a tourist destination and not a place with natives who go about their daily lives. This book finally put everything in perspective for me.

As y’all know, I love me a good best friends to lovers trope, so I was sure going to be read this. The beginning was super similar to another book I’ve reviewed in the past. It’s nice to know that a leaky kitchen pipe has brought so many couples together.

This book revolves around Ashanti Lane, an amazing soon to be awarded newspaper reporter and Luke Zhang, a coffee barista and soon to be coffee shop owner. Basically, she’s killing it, and he’s a bum and she’s too good for him. [Read more…]

Review: Mating the Huntress by Talia Hibbert

Reviewed by Caitlin

A Talia Hibbert novella is the perfect antidote to a reading slump or a terrible week or anything bad ever in your life. The heroine is going to be tough and not particularly interesting in being likable. The hero is going to be big and strong and a total fucking cinnamon roll. And the romance is going to be sweet and sexy.

“Mating the Huntress” was Hibbert’s first paranormal story, but it was a typical Hibbert story in every other way. The heroine, Chastity Adofo, is a total badass who can handle herself in a fight. She comes from a line of werewolf hunters, but because of a prophecy that predicted “her first kill would rip out her own heart.” [Read more…]

Review: Rafe by Rebekah Weatherspoon

Reviewed by Sara

There are plenty of books about nannies. Usually they’re women seduced by the attractive billionaire, mysterious Greek tycoon or the rakish duke.

*yawn*  So, when I saw author Rebekah Weatherspoon tweet about a ginger, bearded and tattooed, motorcycle riding nanny helping a successful and smart single-mom, I was in.

Dr. Sloan Copeland is a young cardiac surgeon in L.A. with two adorable twin 6 year olds. A former child prodigy with an obnoxious ex-husband trying to win her back, she’s left in the lurch when her nanny up and leaves mid-shift. Luckily, she’s got good friends who recommend Rafe Whitcomb. Sloan’s immediately attracted to Rafe, but isn’t sure about how the hot, tattooed white guy will be with her girls. Thankfully Rafe quickly demonstrates a well of limitless compassion and excellent child-tending skills. These and Rafe’s excellent references help Sloan decide to bring Rafe into her family. [Read more…]

Review: Untouchable by Talia Hibbert

Reviewed by Caitlin

Unabashed Talia Hibbert fan here (I think this is the third book of hers I’m reviewing?) and Untouchable is no different. The Ravenswood series is fire, and this one is my favorite so far.

Hannah Kabbah was a nurse in small-town Ravenswood, until she smashed her sister Ruth’s dickhead boyfriend’s car the night of his engagement party to another woman. Now she can’t get a nursing job – with the record and all – so she’s stuck in jobs that have absolutely nothing to do with her education.

She’s a smart woman, but she struggles with depression, and it makes her… not great at some of these jobs. When she’s fired from a coffee shop for erupting at a customer, Hannah is very worried about her future. That is, until Nate Davis – her old school crush – comes in to town. [Read more…]

Review: Catwoman – Soulstealer by Sarah J Maas

Reviewed by Elise

Catwoman: Soulstealer is book three in the DC Icons series. Let me begin by saying I picked up this book because of the author, not because of the content. I have never really been a fan of the DC Universe so I wasn’t expecting to love the book as much as I did. Sarah J Maas is a phenomenal story teller and her retelling of Catwoman was no different.

For fans of the author, the premise may sound a little familiar. Young girl forced into the life of an assassin, turns into blonde, beautiful and frightening intelligent woman who makes men in her life frustrated and in desperate need of antacids. Name of Selina. Does this sound at all familiar? The similarities end at this superficial level and the book is all the better for it.

In the past, the author has been accused of lacking diversity in her work. This book is more representative of the real world and in a positive manner. None of the minority characters are killed off nor are their lives or relationships treated as anything less than normal. There is no ‘big reveal’, the relationships are what they are. Just as it should be. [Read more…]